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20121201
20121231
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. an historic sale here on wall street-- the new york stock exchange, home to the world's greatest companies, agrees to a takeover by the intercontinental exchange. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. former republican senator judd gregg joins us as the u.s. house prepares to vote on the republican plan "b" for avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and investors gobble up shares of blackberry maker research in motion as the smart phone maker posts better than expected quarterly results. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: here at the new york stock exchange, the big trade of the day was the big board itself. the n.y.s.e.-euronext has agreed to sell itself to the intercontinental exchange, an acquisition that would reshape wall street. it's an $8.2 billion deal that values the n.y.s.e. at $33 a share, a 38% premium to wednesday's close. so what are the implications of an upstart exchange buying the venerable big board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independ
studios at lincoln center here in new york. the newtown shooting puts the spotlight on mental health care and access to guns by the mentally ill. there have been reports that adam lanza suffered from asperger's. this is a form of autism. and that he was being treated for some kind of mental illness, but are those things even relevant? we begin this afternoon with a report from the boston station wgbh. >> accused shooter, adam lanza has been described as socially awkward and reclusive with an above average intellect. it's not clear whether the 20-year-old was ever formally diagnosed with a mental illness, but he was reportedly assigned to a psychologist in high school. still, his actions have spurred a renewed call for change in the way we address mental health issues. >> mental illness shove underneath a rock much we can't do that anymore. >> our nation needs to take a different approach to mental health and we need to speak about it more honestly. just as we need to do other things. >> experts say it's essential to improve access to treatment of mental illness and to increase public awar
on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporate profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp growth at 2.1% but the good news is we expect it to accelerate during the course of the year, perhaps reach being 3% by the fourth quarter of 2014. >> tom: what is going to add to that growth considering, is it being held back in the first six months because of the uncertaint
. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the autowa industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy autobiles. thatouldar is change dramatically. >> sue:e steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for the next three years. the qu
. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more viv
that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreemen
pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: when it comes to new claims for jobless benefits, the effects of super storm sandy appear to be passing. new claims fell by 25,000 in the week ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. that's raising hopes about november's jobs data, which is due out tomorrow. grey, and christmas says u.s. employment firm challenger, grey, and christmas says u.s. companies announced 57,000 job cuts last month. separately, the number of planned job cuts rose 20% in november from october's levels. on wall street, the dow rose 39 points, but the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will h
, if the economy picks up sharply, riskier assets could become more attractive. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: more signs today that housing demand is picking up: the number of contracts signed to buy homes rose in november, to its best level in more than two years. the national association of realtors index of pending sales rose almost 10% last month. so will the housing market continue to recover in the new year? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontig as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thet but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices ia little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit lite more confident and may push prices a bit more in 2013. >> what are you finding in termg mater
for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one t
, nbr, new york. >> tom: fast food diners dig in to mcdonald's cheddar bacon onion burger in november. still ahead, an update on much stronger sales at the golden arches. >> susie: christmas is still 15 days away, but fedex predicts today will be its busiest shipping day ever, over 19 million packages. that's more than double the company's typical daily volume, and a 10% jump from last year. today is also known as "green monday," and it kicks off one of the best weeks of the year for online retailers. erika miller reports. >> reporter: if you're wondering why today is called "green monday," its because of all the green changing hands. many of the sales are now online, so stores offer deep discounts to lure shoppers to their sites. the term "green monday" was created by ebay in 2007. it refers to the second monday in december, which is typically that site's biggest sales day of the year. overall, the season appears to be off to a strong start for merchants. >> i think they planned their inventory wisely. i think they planned their markdowns wisely. so, i think that smart retailers are
will be the robin hood foundation. the organization provides funds to about 200 non-profits in the new york area which work directly with sandy relief. bob ottenhoff is the president and c.e.o. of the center for disaster philanthropy. >> most giving to disasters occurs in the first month, but as we now know with sandy the challenges to relief to disasters go on for a long period of time. so we're still going to need lots of charitable contributions for the recovery and rebuilding period. >> reporter: the red cross has already raised $188 million for sandy relief and expects to use more than half of that by the end of the month. but with every disaster, there are always some bad actors. new york state has been at the forefront of holding non-profits accountable. the state attorney general has asked more than 75 charities to show where their sandy relief donations are going. >> these scammers tend to take advantage of people in emotional situations, when they're very concerned about things like disaster relief, and will respond to an ad or an email without really taking the extra step of checking.
within five years. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: using your phone for shopping, is just one of the ways you will use your cell phone in the coming year. as processing power gets bigger and the physical size gets smaller, companies are using that mobile technology to make products you use every day smarter as well. as ruben ramirez reports, those are two of the top tech trends we'll see in 2013. >> reporter: people use smartphones to play games, watch movies and keep up with social media, but for many the mobile phone will become a bigger part of their lives in the coming year. trendwatchers call it the mobile fingerprint or a smartphone as unique as your fingerprint. no need to type in passwords, your phone tells your computer its you, and then locks the screen when you step away. on the health front there's technology to let a smartphone help diabetics measure their glucose levels. and with retailers, going mobile means more than processing payments. >> we do something very specific which is not just focus on the mechanics of payments but the experience around it. everythin
miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: the latest economic statistics the federal reserve can consider is the october trade balance, with american importing a record amount of stuff from china. that increased our trade deficit to $42.2 billion. u.s. exports fell 3.6%, the biggest drop in almost four years. imports also fell, down 2.1% to the lowest in 20 months. on wall street, the dow gained 78, the nasdaq rose 44, the s& up nine. >> susie: our next guest says the fed's stimulus policies have been good for the u.s. economy and the markets. he's mike holland, chairman of his money management firm, holland and company. >> susie: mike, you heard erica's report. which do you think is more important for investors, fed policy action tor the fiscal cliff talks? >> right now, susie, the fiscal cliff talks are clearly the item dejure for the stock market. i think most people expect exactly what eric miller was talking about from the fed. and bern bueno ben bernanke hasn transparent and telling people well in advance what he is going to do. the $85 billion should continue building up for our ta
, exactly. so to you let's go to the defense of marriage act case. and this came out of new york. first of all explain how the defense of marriage act worked and how did this one case involving an 83-year-old woman in edie wind sore-- windsor raise the issue. >> well, the challenge here is to a provision in the defense of marriage act, section 3. and that defines for all federal purposes marriage is between one man and one womanment and by doing that it affects more than a thousand federal laws, everything from tax laws to social security and health and welfare benefits. the defense of marriage act was challenged by edie windsor from new york. she had a partner for over 40 years. they were married in 2007 in canada, a new york recognized their marriage when miss windsor's partner, her spouse died. her spouse left her entire estate to edie windsor. because of the defense of marriage act edie windsor was left with almost a 400,000 dollar federal estate tax that someone who was the spouse of an opposite sex coup weill not have had to pay. so their defense of marriage act can being challeng
.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just sort of cast one vote against all of them. the second thing that happened was republicans gave up some seats in the house and senate. it will still be a republican majority in january but it will be smaller. if right-to-work was going to happen this lame duck republican-controlled legislature was where it was going to happen. >> woodruff: bill, in a state that voted by ten points for president obama in november, it's a state that is striking a blow for right-to-work. how do you explain that? >> there was a mixeded result on november 6. i think
was expected from new york state to maine. by last night, it was already on the way. >> the winds were fierce it was blowing the cars around and you could see the semi's were swerving. >> ifill: the storm also forced cancellation of hundreds of flights and the ripple effects reached as far west as san francisco. >> after i found out my flight had been canceled after four hours of waiting in the airport, i had to wait another three hour customer service line, which i didn't even get to the end of before the booth closed. >> ifill: about a 1,000 people spent christmas night on cots at dallas/fort worth international airport. by dawn, patience was wearing thin. one fed-up pilot apologized to his passengers over the loudspeaker, after they were forced to wait on the tarmac for almost five hours. >> ifill: by this evening, the worst of the weather was moving into new england. but in its wake, nearly 200,000 customers had lost power across the southeast and midwest, making home for the holidays unexpectedly cold and dark. >> warner: still to come on the "newshour": court-ordered treatment for the m
corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. the clements foundation, park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alfred foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audrey rappaport foundation. and the betsey fink foundation. barbara g. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonym
. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those
firefighters in rochester, new york and a policeman and bystander in houston, texas. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the killings, coming ten days after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. >> brown: then, we turn to egypt, and accusations of voting fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned chi
corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middl
it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the e
.5% by the end of next year. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: still ahead, could legalized recreational marijuana use become the new competitor for medical dope? we speak with the c.e.o. of marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> susie: american consumers did a bit of shopping in november after laying low the month before. retail sales rose three tenths of 1% last month, following a decline of the same amount in october. the pickup in november spending is a hopeful sign for an economy that many fear is slowing down. but retail experts say the trend can hardly be considered strong. >> it's muddling along. expectations were for 0.5% increase; it came in at 0.3% and that's off of a weak october. remember, october was quite weak. so, these are not robust numbers, they're not terrible numbers. it's a continuation of a sluggish consumer, that is still sluggish as the year wore on. >> susie: november sales were twice as strong if we don't include a big decline in spending at the pump. gas station sales posted their biggest drop in four years. instead of filling up, consumers bought cars, cl
do that now when the cost of money is still so cheap. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: american automakers got a bump up in sales in november, thanks to super storm sandy. consumers postponed purchases when the hurricane hit in october, and resumed buying last month. but as diane eastabrook reports, the looming fiscal cliff could cause that sales momentum to lose traction. >> reporter: november turned out to be a good month for the big three and a great month for their foreign competitors. g.m. and ford both saw a modest uptick in vehicle sales last month-- while chrysler got a double digit boost. but competitors from europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent
and cool temperatures. perfect for a little spending. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> well, if you driving to the mall, you are paying a lot less for gas, pump prices are plunging dropping seven and a half percent in november. the national average for gasoline is now $3.30 a gallon. >> and that is the main reason consumer prices were down last month. the index of consumer prices which includes everything from the cost of milk to the price of a haircut fell three-tenths of a percent, that is the largest drop since may. >> but here on wall street investors ignored that up beat news and were fixated on the stalled talks in washington about the fiscal cliff. >> the dow lost 36 points, the nasdaq down 21, the s and b 500 fell, s&p fell also. >> looking at the outlook for gas and oil prices, we turn to an oil analyst, founding partner at again capital. >> you know, john, i was thinking looking over these numbers a few weeks ago here in the northeast we were paying close to $5 a gallon for gasoline, of course it was because of hurricane sandy and standing in line, gas lines, and now this.
be samsung. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: another nick to toyota's reputation. the automaker is paying a record fine, more than $17 million, for failing to promptly report safety defects related to a lexus recall. this is the second time since 2010 that toyota has paid fines for not properly reporting vehicle defects to u.s. regulators. toyota once had the best reputation for quality and safety, but in the last three years it has announced numerous recalls for separate investigations into sticky pedals, poorly designed floor mats and steering rod problems. >> susie: big changes coming to pfizer. the giant drug maker plans to cut about 20% of its u.s. sales force, or 600 jobs. according to a report from bloomberg, the cuts begin this month and are said to be part of c.e.o. ian read's strategy to reposition pfizer after losing patent protection on its top selling drug, lipitor. at its peak, that cholesterol drug generated revenues of nearly $10 billion a year for pfizer. while lipitor's loss was tough for pfizer, it was a boon for generic drug makers. but in the coming year, fa
, new york. >> susie: don't let the fiscal cliff scare you away from buying stocks. that's the advice to investors from andy cross, the chief investment officer at the motley fool. tom hudson recently spoke with him, and began by asking if the s&p 500 will be higher or lower this time next year. >> that's a tough question. i'm not in the job of picking the stocks over, you know, three, six, nine, even 12 months is tough for me. here's what i do think. i do think we'll get some resolution to the fiscal cliff, whether it's right now or whether it's soon after the new year, i think we will see some kind of resolution. that will be good for markets, good for business, good for investors. so i'm going into 2013 wanting to be long some really good high quality companies that i know can accrue returns for investors over time. and i don't want to think with the next few months. >> tom: let's focus on the next year ahead. what about volatility, do you think you'll need an iron stomach to be a stock investor? >> i think investing in stocks, in equities comes volatility. we're not buying bonds h
. >> school of business at dartmouth with us tonight in new york. sydney, nice to see you and welcome. you have four of the worst c.e.o.'s of the year, beginning with number 4, mark pincus, manager of zynga that relies on facebook for its success. what brought mark to your list. >> facebook and zynga announced they would go their separate ways and no longer be tied in and you can guess who that will affect more, facebook or zynga. one executive manager after another has left and that is always something i have seen as one of the reason warnings signs of something going wrong. along the way acquisition was made for $180 millujjy didn't take them more than half a year to write down 50% of the value of that acquisition. so it really look like a company that is floundering and mark pincus along the way ended out cashing out as quickly as possible raising eye browse in the possible. >> to the makeup industry and fashion. andrea young, the former c.e.o. of avon, still the chairman. this company rejected a buy outr offer earlier in the year when the share price was closeƑi to 3 where it is now.
that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad to step down. for more on all of this, we turn to dimitri simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't kno
. the attacks highlighted an upsurge in rebel assaults around damascus and elsewhere. "the new york times" reported the syrian military is now fighting back with scud missiles, firing at least a half dozen in recent days. against that backdrop, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action aga
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)